jazzoLOG: Heavy With Child    
 Heavy With Child31 comments
picture19 Aug 2007 @ 11:07, by Richard Carlson

Let us dig our gardens and not be elsewhere;
Let us take long walks in the open air...
Let us bathe in the rivers and lakes...
Let us indulge in games...
Let us be more simple: simple and true in our gestures, in our words, and simple and true in our minds above all. Let us be ourselves.

---Robert Linssen

Finish every day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities crept in. Forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day; you should begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.

---Ralph Waldo Emerson

Don't ask if I've ceased my wanderings;
already I've trampled all over the south.
Understanding should be what you yourself understand.
Mind is not someone else's mind.

---Ch'i-Chi

Karl Brulloff. Italian Woman Heavy with a Child Examining a Shirt and her Husband Making a Cradle. 1831. Watercolour on cardboard.

There is a great benefit in writing...and it's not just another chance to tell people what to do. It's not even to inform friends and relations what you've been up to. The gift of writing your words is in the opportunity to collect your thoughts and work on them thus. Maybe you'll share it, maybe you won't. Here, in this writing, I will be heartfelt.

Presently my family is enjoying the presence in our home of the lady our son has chosen totally. And she has chosen him. They have been friends throughout their schooling in this town, and in recent years discovered their feelings were true love. They felt even more freedom together in that realization, and became joyfully radiant in celebration. Everyone around them knew it to be so and benefitted in their presence. Jeroch and Karen are a couple and you can see it strongly.

A few months ago a child decided to be born out of them, and Karen carries her now to fruition in December. They have a charming house chosen for this beginning, and they await final preparations for them to move in...probably next month. In the new style of American youth---that some elders are tempted to call cart-before-the-horse---they haven't gotten around to the stupendous wedding occasion that is sure to come. For one thing, her older sister also is getting married, and Karen is deferring to her in mutual agreement to have the first wedding. And who's to say the horse can't be in the back, pushing or something?

Jeroch is spending most of the summer in an internship at the esteemed Omega Institute for Holistic Studies [link] . He's been emailing people throughout his experience about the amazing people and great sages he has met. It is clear he is growing in every direction. Karen had spent a month in Mexico earlier in the summer, receiving certification in an advanced yoga discipline. Together they are preparing for this birth, marriage and family in a most unique and individual way. Jeroch was here during the last week, and it was wonderful to enjoy their company in our home until he flew back to Rhinebeck Friday.

In the autumn and continuing, they may be able share these new skills with others as there is great interest in these things in this community of Athens. But they will support themselves simply, as Karen's university degree qualifies her for substitute teaching at this point, and Jeroch works in the managing of Crumb's Bakery, a business with rapidly expanding distribution.

For Jeroch's mom, his younger sister, and me, the challenge is to watch and participate in all this---hmmm, how shall I put it?---without worrying too much. I suppose families normally worry about each other, but the gracefulness of this caring mustn't become a burden for the loved one. I'm discovering it's hard to do. I never thought there was any special skill you had to learn to become a grandparent, but...as with the rest of life...HELLO.

When your child is in the house, you tend to do all this teaching and regulating stuff. You've only got a dozen years or so to get it all packed in there---all the traditions, the rights and wrongs, the skills, the healthy lifestyle, the work and the fun. And at some point, the kid starts wanting to do it his way and not necessarily yours...and the tension about freedom surfaces bigtime. Then the child goes, and there's this period when father and son are just these 2 guys looking across at each other. Did it end up you can be friends or are there still tensions from the battles?

I guess the grandparent time is when I get to sit down and do the learning. Perhaps there are families out there in America in the 21st Century where the children proceed to do everything they learned at home...and just live it out the same way the family did, and maybe the generations before them. But I didn't do that and I don't think my wife did either...but not as radically as I had to do things my own way. I'm sure my parents laid awake nights worrying about me, but when they let slip that they did I didn't want to hear about it. Now it's my turn.

How many problems can Dana, Ilona, and I think up that might befall these 2 angels---soon to be 3? How anxious can we become about preparing them for the unexpected pitfalls? We mustn't spread such nervousness. We need to sit quietly, we need the silent strength within, we need to pray, we need to have and show faith. There is great work and growth in grandparenting. And isn't it great if you have a kindly aunt who actually cares about and spends time with you? This has been a huge summer!

May I conclude with a section of Jeroch's writing he sent out onto the Internet a couple weeks ago? Here he is talking about something called Retreat Week...and a meditation master whom he met, and it appears what Jeroch has to tell me is just what I need to hear~~~

Adyashanti is a teacher of one of the silent retreats. "Adyashanti is a dynamic and inspiring spiritual teacher who lives an ordinary life while demonstrating an extraordinary gift for transmitting a simple truth: liberation is the birthright of us all. His teachings have been compared to those of the early Zen masters and Advaita Vedanta sages. Over the last 10 years of Adyashanti’s teaching, his sangha (spiritual community) has grown to several thousand students worldwide, and he has published three books of his teachings: The Impact of Awakening, My Secret is Silence, and Emptiness Dancing." It just so happens that the day I chose to be silent, Adyashanti was giving a staff lecture hour. These staff hours are a tremendous blessing. It is always very personal, intimate and there are always moments of deep reflection. Adyashanti is a bright, shining light of a being. He radiates a simple truth. That inner silence leads to deep realization. I think almost the entire staff attended the discussion, it was packed. Many of the other staff members had also taken vows to remain silent. We had the opportunity to ask questions of him, so I took my pen and wrote down something I had thought of that had left me very curious. After two very emotional questions that he offered extensive teachings on, he said we had time for one more. I rose my hand and to my delight he chose me. I walked up to the front of the theater and handed him my inquiry. He read it. And then read it again. And smiled. And I smiled. And a moment of infinite love passed. He spoke into the microphone and read it aloud. " I love silence, love it! But isn't silence an illusion? Everywhere I go I hear my heartbeat." I will paraphase his answer. " All is silence. Reality is an Explosion of silence. When one has the capabilty to be silent inwardly, then one will be able to hear the truth. The truth cannot be spoken, cannot be summed up through words. Your heart beat, the wind blowing in the trees" He waved his hands above his head like the wind. "This is the explosion of silence." We bowed deeply to each other for his answer had filled my heart with joy. And for the rest of the day I enjoyed the explosions of silence. I learned much from my day in silence. Much that cannot be put into words, yet. Mostly I learned how important it is that we communicate our inner most feelings. Letting out that which is at the center of our souls. The Love at the center of our being. I have only a few more days here at Omega and am taking the time to enjoy every moment of it. I hope that all of you are having wonderful experiences living the lives that you love. You are in my thoughts and prayers. Love, peace and harmony through cooperation. Jeroch


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31 comments

19 Aug 2007 @ 16:29 by jerryvest : Thanks for sharing your experience with
your children and the joy you feel being with them. This is a wonderful expression of love. Richard, I'm certain that your influnence and values have been assimilated in a beautiful way that offers all of us and humanity hope for a future that this generation will manifest in right action through wisdom, compassion and love.

I can tell you that being a grandparent is one of the greatest opportunities that I have ever had and when I am with my kids, I can experience the truth, in the moment, beyond words. Children can teach us much about reality, compassion, and love...we do need to learn how to find our child, listen and be with them with an open mind. Thanks, Jerry.  



20 Aug 2007 @ 19:02 by Flemming Funch @82.234.200.36 : Just a test
Testing if comments work  


20 Aug 2007 @ 19:37 by jazzolog @207.69.137.42 : Thanks Flemming
We're interrupting this program to--er---check this program. A number of folks have written saying this feature doesn't work...but maybe it would be more accurate to say, like all things Internet, it does have its fickle moments. Ming wrote from outside, and that's what I'm doing too.  


21 Aug 2007 @ 19:03 by Quinty @72.195.137.102 : I guess
you just have to be brave. And never lose it, if possible.

Here's a bit of Whitman....

Have we not stood here like trees in the ground long enough?
Have we not groveled here long enough, eating and drinking, like mere brutes?
Have we not darkened and dazed ourselves with books long enough?
Sail forth -- steer for the deep waters only.
Reckless, O soul, exploring, I with thee, and though with me,
For we are bound where mariner has not yet dared to go,
And we will risk the ship, ourselves and all.

O my brave soul!
O farther, farther sail!
O daring joy, but safe! are they not all the seas of God?
O farther, farther, farther sail!

from Passage to India  



22 Aug 2007 @ 16:21 by bagheera : Lovely :-)
Thanks, Richard, it warms my heart to hear these news.
(Shakti)  



22 Aug 2007 @ 18:18 by a-d : Is'n this what it takes to volunteer
to bring in a New Soul to this Octave of Life? ....A LOT of Courage! But with taking on that challenge-of-Courage, as it were- comes its Blessings as well! Wishing you guys ALL the very BEST!
"Courage is not the absence of fear; it is the making of action in spite of fear; the moving out against the resistance engendered by fear into the unknown and into the future."  



22 Aug 2007 @ 18:59 by vaxen : It's
Thou with me, as in "I and Thou" Martin Buber. Or "Do what THOU wilt, shall be the whole of the law." Frater Perdurabo. Dear quinty san. Forgive my correcting you, please, and do not take offense. The way you wrote it does make sense but...

How fickle the moon. The sun isn't any better either, and jazzolog maybe it would behoove you (BE HOOVE!) to do what Gezi has done as the poor fellow has been without 'comment' for such a long, dreary, time. I love to muck around, over there, with the CIA sponsored mind wrecks over there and that isn't possible anymore...no, wait, yes it is!

But in another place...

I don't think it takes a lot of courage to bring a new 'soul' into this 'Octave?' of life...Octave? please, A-d, haven't we trance ended octaves by now? I mean ever do the fibonacci spiral musically? Mean spirits abound.

Getting back to courage. All it takes is a slip of the...

Hey jazzolog, congratz, hombre, when the little spirit does come in I hope you're somewhere around to guide it past the reefs. Good show mate.  



22 Aug 2007 @ 21:03 by Quinty @72.195.137.102 : That was a
typo. Had I unlocked the door before entering I would have returned to correct it. Always dangerous entering this way, as I am now, since you can not return to make changes.

The password is "jarojo" and let's hope it works. That "though" does look bad, doesn't it? A stumble which should indeed cause offense. It's art, damn it. And needs to be precise. Enough. Let's see if the password works and if I have to come back to correct an error?

Don't mess with Whitman. He needs no improving on. Nor editor, lucky man.  



23 Aug 2007 @ 06:27 by vaxen : Heh, heh...
yeah...Whitmans' chocolates. Gotta love it. "jarojo!" Sounds like a voodoo holiday sung by a carooning (crooning thus not a typo but a...) Billy.

I love those little code words. Most sites I caome across that have them take me two or three times to get straight for they are mostly unreadable! But here? A breeze and fun names too...

Though I much prefer Li Po over Walt any day of the week I certainly wouldn't mess with that beloved soul...or would I? ;) Well...

"...though with me..." Glad it's not agin me. "You're either for us or you're against us." Dubya (Double U) Double speak is more like it. DubbaSpeak?

;)  



23 Aug 2007 @ 10:25 by jazzolog : Are There More Bagheeras Or Shaktis
on the Internet these days? And how many Hidden Profiles dance and sing their anonymity in the fabulous New Civilization? Maybe the new name should be Masked Civilization. That would be cool. Everyday is Halloween. I'm shaking already. So much for my courage. The good part of it is I just might be shaking off a thick layer of dust that has settled over me since a certain Shakti walked out of this network.

I'm not sure where the typo is in quinty's comment. Let me know Paul, and I'll change it.

Thanks for all the well wishes, friends. It's clear vaxen's never given birth a-d (possibly the ONLY thing he hasn't done already), or he'd know how many octaves may be required in the vocal range of the full production. I wonder whether he has any kids upon whom to pass the glorious mantle. (Right now he's saying, "I KNEW I shouldn't have commented at this entry!")  



23 Aug 2007 @ 14:44 by vaxen : Here...
"Reckless, O soul, exploring, I with thee, and though with me,"

And why weep...Shakti ("Here for the duration." - Shakti Ma) still has her beat, ever go there? Do you still communicate? And Bagheera? Still around, neh?

Giving birth and octaves. Being a musician I trance ended Octavial thought long, long ago...there are other musical forms, you know?

And I am a man so how could I give birth? Well, it is true that that is a matter of participles but...just not interested.

I much prefer little animal babies to little animal human babies. But after they are grown up...that's just fine. I don't like babies, never did, never will.

And just think of all the murdered ones in Iraq, or elsewhere, who never really get to see the beauties of life. They can thank America, corporate greed, governments, whatever - for snuffing out their lives...

They'll be back, you say, yeah...with a vengeance. But by then there will be no Earth so...enjoy your brief time in the sun, little one, the iron heel soon will come crashing through your soft, sweet, night.  



23 Aug 2007 @ 18:27 by Quinty @72.195.137.102 : Yeah,
that's it. Thou instead of though. Though I don't think Walt would greatly care, now that we all have the point and see the error anyway.

I'm with "worowa" now, which is the cure for jarojo. Laboratory tests prove it is the most effective treatment.

Can a million Worowites be wrong? In all their manifestations?

It is, after all, a miracle of modern advertising, the shaman's arts, psychoanalysis, modern chemestry, conjuring, wishful thinking, politics, necromancy, skulldudgery - both firstclass and secondclass, the art of flying, with and without wings, childish leaping, advanced cartwheeling, powerful spitting (but not into the wind, oh no, not ever into the wind) belly flopping on dry and wet surfaces, advanced neumismatics (I just wanted to see if I could spell that one? Couldn't) and better than any prefrontal lobotomy performed in either sunshine or the dark. But if it lasts more than four hours be sure to immediately contact your doctor. (That's an inside joke for all you who live outside the great American mainstream.) Indeed, if it last twenty four hours call 911!

This is powerful medicine indeed! Now let's see if it works.

Open worowa!  



27 Aug 2007 @ 14:18 by bagheera : Naaaaah...
Not masked - I have left the network but still come back sometimes with my daughter´s ID to have a look at your blog (and Vaxen´s - tee hee - hello Vaxen-San).
Best wishes - and the Spanish project is flourishing - it´s a lot of work in the real world!:-D  



28 Aug 2007 @ 08:49 by jazzolog : The Spanish Mask
I noticed some time ago that Shakti's daughter had rejoined NCN (I think) but didn't observe that or when her Profile became hidden. The whole dance of masks sometimes becomes a topic of hot conversation around here, but I hasten to tell you it is possible eventually to get used to it...and even enjoy its amusing novelty. For newcomers, Shakti was, for a few years, the most influential and committed member of us 2nd or 3rd generation NCNers. (This is what Vax means in quoting her in his comment above.) Eventually though, for reasons I'd never attempt to analyze (publicly anyway), she moved on to a site or 2 that better serve her interests. A devastating array of characters left about the same time. The "Spanish project" is a fascinating spiritual community with which she is involved in that country---and, one even might say, runs. Of course we miss her---and her family...and an entourage of Spanish folk who graced the site for a while---and am honored if she looks in from time to time.

Oh well, now that I'm warmed up, let's have an update on the granddaughter emerging and others. After Jeroch returned to Omega to finish out his work there, Karen stayed on with us for another week. She then moved to the home of a friend who needed some August housesitting. Their new place should be ready for them just about the time Jeroch gets home...and all should nestle down securely as we move into the last trimester. Today is Karen's birthday (24---sigh) and I believe we have the upstairs at Lui Lui's reserved for a dinner party.

This also is the first day back to school for all the kids in Athens, Ohio. We staffers were on the job yesterday, getting supplies, putting final touches on classrooms, and plotting our strategies. Ahhh, the fragrance of chalkdust and floor wax!  



28 Aug 2007 @ 12:00 by vaxen : butterfly kiddo!
Yeah, I miss them, too, jazzolog. I sometimes dream of going to Catalonia to see the Black Virgin and Shakti Ma and Butterfly Kiddo and that old goat of a man who makes great gardens...

"But they needed him at the Alamo..." -- so the old tale goes.

September starts the new school season? Behavior Mod Inc., at it again...

Just when scientists discover, to their shock and chagrin, a hole in the universe.

"El Ballete De El Sombrero Del Tres Picos" -- Manuel De Falla

Hello Shakti Ma. I miss you and wish you were here but, really, you're always in my thoughts so...you are here! ;)

Bachianas Brasileras (Villa Lobos) and Chants d'Espagne (Albeniz) should always remind you of me...  



29 Aug 2007 @ 15:18 by jazzolog : On A Teacherly Note
The Brasileiras part of the title reminds us to look for a Brazilian composer, and Villa Lobos flies to our rescue...like Rima the Bird Girl. De Falla gives us those romantic nights in the gardens of Spanish goats.  


29 Aug 2007 @ 18:51 by vaxen : Schoene...
Danke, on that wee correction. Villa Lobos being, perhaps, my favorite composer of all time -- Bachianas Brasileiras, number 5, being my favorite, was composed for the legendary Ima Sumac and if you haven't heard it then you simply must.

Having Had De Falla (Nights In The Gardens Of Spain) on my mind, as well as Yitzhak Albeniz, and so many others; I committed the unpardonable sin of...

But we are saved by grace alone so...

Schoene Danke to our teacher yet one more time. How is it you escaped the floods, jazzo? Or did you?  



30 Aug 2007 @ 10:19 by jazzolog : My Faith In Vax Is Crushed
I always thought this guy knew everything---at least 8 paragraphs and a couple dozen Internet links more than I did about anything...but now what do I discover? As we all know Villa Lobos composed several Bachiana Brasileiras---his Brazilian tributes to the influence of Bach---the most famous being No. 5, sung by everybody from Joan Baez to Linda Ronstadt. The piece was dedicated however to the astonishing Brazilian soprano, Bidu Sayao, who died in 1999 (at age 97!) but whose mid '40s recording remains definitive. Bidu entertained the composer during one of his visits to New York, by humming the piece which originally was scored for violin. In honor of her ensuing recording, Villa Lobos added the fast dance later. Their last project together was the film music he wrote for the ho-hum movie of Green Mansions. The score, however, is worth the price of admission, and probably still is available on CD as Forest Of The Amazon. It is said Yma Sumac was not actually an Aztec princess, but Amy Camus from The Bronx. Yma Sumac is Amy Camus spelled backwards.  


30 Aug 2007 @ 15:51 by vaxen : Rebut for jazzo...
===
Yma Súmac (born in Ichocán, Cajamarca, Perú September 10, 1922), also earlier spelled Ymma Sumak (from Ima Shumaq, Quechua for "how beautiful!")[1] or Imma Sumack, is a noted dramatic coloratura soprano of Peruvian origin. In the 1950s, she was one of the most famous proponents of exotica music, and became an international success based on the merits of her wide-ranging voice, which ranges "well over three octaves"[2] and was commonly claimed to span four[3] and five[4]octaves at its peak.

=

Biography

Yma Súmac was born on September 10, 1922 in Callao[4] near Ichocán (Cajamarca, Peru) as Zoila Augusta Emperatriz Chávarri del Castillo. Other dates mentioned in her various biographies range from 1921 to 1929. Some sources[5] claim that she was not born in Ichocán, but in a nearby village or possibly in Lima, and that her family owned a ranch in Ichocán where she spent most of her early life. It is also claimed that she is an Incan princess directly descended from Atahualpa. The story that she was actually born Amy Camus (Yma Sumac backwards) in Brooklyn or Canada is a hoax.[6] This reference asserts that she was known as Imma Sumack in recordings made before she went to the U.S.; Capitol Records changed the spelling to the more exotic "Yma Sumac". For a few months, in and around Capitol Records headquarters, it was rumored that Yma Sumac was actually a woman named Amy Camus who worked in the accounting department, but that was eventually disproved by Amy herself in her famous "I can't even sing" memo of August 1951.[citation needed]

She first appeared on radio in 1942, and married composer and bandleader Moisés Vivanco on June 6 the same year. Using the stage name Imma Sumack [5], she recorded at least eighteen tracks of Peruvian folk songs in Argentina in 1943 . These early recordings for the Odeon label featured Moisés Vivanco's group, Compañía Peruana de Arte, a group of 46 Indian dancers singers and musicians. In 1946, Yma Sumac and Vivanco moved to New York City, where she performed with the Inca Taky Trio, with Moisés Vivanco on guitar, Yma Sumac's cousin Cholita Rivero singing contralto and dancing, and Yma Sumac providing the soprano, until being signed by Capitol Records in 1950.

During the 1950s, she produced a series of legendary lounge recordings featuring Hollywood-style versions of Incan and South American folk songs, working with the likes of Les Baxter and Billy May. In 1951, she popularized Jorge Bravo de Rueda's classic song "Vírgenes del Sol". The combination of her extraordinary voice, exotic looks and stage personality made her a hit with American audiences. Sumac even appeared in a Broadway musical, Flahooley, in 1951, as a foreign princess who brings Aladdin's lamp to an American toy factory to have it repaired. The show's score was by Sammy Fain and E.Y. "Yip" Harburg, but Sumac's four numbers were the work of Vivanco. Capitol Records, Sumac's home label, recorded the show, which failed but has lived on as a cult classic, in part because it also marked the Broadway debut of Barbara Cook. During the height of Sumac's popularity, she appeared in the films Secret of the Incas (1954) and Omar Khayyam (1957); she became a U.S. citizen July 22, 1955.

In 1957, she and Vivanco divorced. They remarried that same year before divorcing again in 1965. They had one son, Charles, born in 1949. Apparently due to financial difficulties, Yma Sumac and the original Inca Taky Trio went on a world tour in 1961, which lasted for five years. They performed in 40 cities in the Soviet Union, and afterwards all over Europe, Asia and Latin America. Their performance in Bucharest, Romania was recorded as the album Recital, her only 'live in concert' record. Yma Sumac spent the rest of the 1960s performing sporadically.

In 1971, she released a rock album, called Miracles, and then returned to live in Peru. She performed in concert from time to time during the 1970s in Peru and later in New York. In the 1980s, she had a number of concerts both in the U.S. and abroad including at New York's The Ballroom in 1987 and several San Francisco shows at the Theatre on the Square among others. In 1987, she also recorded the song "I Wonder" from the Disney film Sleeping Beauty for Stay Awake, an album of songs from Disney movies, produced by Hal Willner. She sang Ataypura during a March 19, 1987 appearance on Late Night with David Letterman, appearing alongside actor-comedians Jerry Seinfeld and Bill Murray.

In 1989, she sang once again at The Ballroom in New York. In March 1990, she played the role of Heidi in Stephen Sondheim's Follies, in Long Beach, California, her first attempt at serious theater since Flahooley in 1951. She also gave several concerts in the summer of 1996 in San Francisco and Hollywood and two more in Montreal, Canada in July 1997 as part of the Montreal International Jazz Festival. She currently lives in Los Angeles.

In 1992, Günther Czernetsky directed a documentary titled Yma Sumac - Hollywoods Inkaprinzessin (Yma Sumac - Hollywood's Inca princess).

On May 2, 2006, Sumac flew to Lima, where she was given the "Orden del Sol" award by Peruvian President Alejandro Toledo, and the Jorge Basadre medal by the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.

Recordings
At least 18 tracks of Peruvian folk songs in Argentina in 1943 for the Odeon label, with. Moisés Vivanco's group, Compañía Peruana de Arte—a group of 46 Indian dancers, singers and musicians. (10" 78rpm).
Voice of the Xtabay (1950), Capitol H-244 (10" LP)
Inca Taqui (1953), Capitol L-243 (10" LP)
Voice of the Xtabay, Capitol W-684 (both of the above on one 12" LP)
Legend of the Sun Virgin (1953), Capitol T-299
Mambo (1954), Capitol T-564
Legend of the Jivaro (1957), Capitol T-770
Fuego Del Andes (1959), Capitol ST 1169
Recital/Live in Bucharest (1961), ELECTRECOR EDE073
Miracles (1971), London XPS 608 - Reissued on CD as Yma Rocks! (1998), JOM-1027-2
I Wonder on Stay Awake: Various Interpretations of Music from Vintage Disney Films, 1988 (one of Various Artists).

Triva

Her song "Bo Mambo" has appeared in a commercial for Kahlua liquor, and was sampled for the song "Hands Up" by the Black Eyed Peas

External links
Official Yma Sumac Site
Yma-Sumac.com
Yma Súmac at TV.com
Excerpts from book on Yma Sumac
Yma Sumac at the Cotillian Room in New York

References
^ Cusihuaman 2001: p. 47, 103
^ Ellen Highstein: 'Yma Sumac (Chavarri, Emperatriz)', Grove Music Online ed. L. Macy (Accessed 8 August 2006), [1]
^ Clarke Fountain, "Yma Sumac: Hollywood's Inca Princess (review). All Movie Guide, reproduced in the New York Times. 1992. [2]
^ David Richards, "The Trill of a Lifetime; Exotic Singer Yma Sumac Meets a New Wave of Fans." The Washington Post, March 2, 1987, STYLE; PAGE B1. Accessed August 6, 2006, via Lexis Nexis, [3]
^ Yma Sumac official website Clicking on Biography or search required; "ranch" will suffice.
^ Yma Sumac official website Clicking on Biography or search required.

Sources
"Yma Sumac Becomes Citizen". New York Times, July 23, 1955, p. 10.
"Yma Sumac's Divorce Final". New York Times, May 21, 1958, p. 39.
"Yma Sumac... the Voice of the Incas". Fate (magazine), Vol. 4, No. 8, November-December 1951
Four Octave Inca, Pathfinder, November 11, 1950. Retrieved 16 Oct 2005. A piece contemporaneous with the release of Voice of the Xtabay.
Cusihuamán, Antonio. Diccionario Quechua Cuzco-Collao, 2001, Centro de Estudios Regionales Andinos "Bartolomé de Las Casas". ISBN 9972-691-36-5



For beginners, jazzo---  



30 Aug 2007 @ 16:24 by vaxen : CD Available
Heitor Villa Lobos (1887-1959):Bachianas Brasileiras
(Complete)
Rosana Lamosa (soprano), José Feghali (piano),

Nashville Symphony Orchestra, Kenneth Schermerhorn / Andrew Mogrelia

8.557460-62 (UPC 747313246021)

Review from All Music Guide / BarnesandNoble.com
James Manheim

All too often, box sets with the complete this or the collected that represent a by-the-pound mentality that's ultimately destructive to classical music, a substitute for intelligent program selection that entertains and instructs. The nine "Bachianas Brasileiras" of Heitor Villa-Lobos, however, may be the exception. Often excerpted (the two-movement No. 5, for voice and eight cellos is the most famous, with its Yma Sumac-like opening vocalise), they give the listener something more to think about when played from start to finish -- they reveal the variety of which Villa-Lobos was capable even when working within the triple set of constraints he established for himself. . . . The Nashville Symphony under Kenneth Schermerhorn . . . are comfortable within the modest orchestral dimensions of these pieces, and Schermerhorn avoids the overwrought quality they are sometimes given. . . . the set will appeal to the growing body of listeners interested in orchestral music of the Americas.

[link]



PS: It was my mentor Bashir Ahmed (Charles Paniagua) who first turned me on to Ima Sumac, while I was studying classical guitar with Joseph Bacon in San Francisco ages ago.

We brought back, from Mexico City (Sandoz Drug Company), some of the best Lyserguc Acid Diethylamide. Smuggled in in crystal balls that were specially made for some of San Frans best chandeliers. It was in liquid form. Once extracted I'd take it to Berkeley so that some meat head Scientists there could do experiments with it utilising it in some of the best experiments ever concocted towards the eventual aim of dissolving hard core personalities such as that one finds in, say, the most rigid of Spae Konar. I was paid handsomely for my work but best of all I got to hear Ima Sumac...

Care for more?

Open Source Solutions
OSS RA
Division 7
Department 21

RDA  



30 Aug 2007 @ 18:32 by vaxen : Poquito mas...
To those who doubt the official story there is in the files of the Peruvian consul in New York, according to the Chicago Tribune, an affidavit bearing the great seal of Peru which reads:
"I hereby certify that to the best of my knowledge, and in accordance with the assertions of authorities on the history of the Incas and on Peruvian history in general, whose names will be furnished upon request, Imma Summack is a descendant of the Inca, Atahualpa, her mother having been Donna Emilia Atahualpa, direct descendant of the last Emperor of Peru. Signed: Jose Varela y Aria, Consul General del Peru, May 23, 1946."

For more information about Yma Sumac, check out her Fan Club site, [link]

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Yma Sumac has the most amazing singing voice of our time. They say "that she has a panther and a nightingale in her throat."
"There is no voice like it in the world of music today," says. Critic Glenn Dillard Gunn of the Washington Times-Herald. "Her voice has a greater range than any female voice of concert or opera. It soars into the acoustic stratosphere, or it plumbs the sub-contralto depth of pitch with equal ease. Such voices happen only once in a generation."
Jarmila Novotna, the Metropolitan Opera Company's great soprano, called Yma Sumac's voice "about the most exciting I've ever heard." Ezio Pinza, amazed at her range, warned her to take care of her voice. One critic said, "'Her Voice is that of birds and of the earthquake."
According to the official story, here is how Yma Sumac was discovered...
Sixteen thousand feet above the sea, in the village of Ichocan in the Andes of Peru, the annual festival to the sun god was in progress. Suddenly a pause came in the impressive ceremonies as the 30,000 Indians fell silent in anticipation of the most exciting event of the festival, the advent of the taita inty, virgin of the sun god.
On the still mountain air came a voice, a woman's voice, chanting the traditional Inca Hymn to the Sun, forbidden music which dates back hundreds of years. As though from another world the thrilling tones of her voice rang through the air, and as each note struck upon the ears of the gathered Indians, more and more excitement over came them; for here, before them, was the miracle their prophets had promised for centuries--here be fore them was the "voice of the earthquake," incarnate in the body of the most beautiful woman in all the Andes, directly descended from Atahualpa, last of the Inca kings!
As the weird and mysterious chanting of the Inca Hymn came to an end, a roar rose from the crowd. "The Chosen Maiden!" they were screaming; raised to a high pitch of ecstasy by the voice they had just heard, an unbelievable voice, an impossible voice, the like of which exists nowhere else on earth today. "The chosen maiden of the sun! Sing to us the Accla Taquil."
And sing she did; the chant of the Chosen Maidens. As the incredible notes fell upon their ears, reaching from a depth as rich and throaty as a French Horn to notes so pure and high that a flute would have fallen silent at its failure to compete, the madness in the Indians grew to an obsession. In that moment, this beautiful woman singing before them was transformed into the bird who became a woman," and assumed an almost deified position in the land of the Incas. ' Then she sang the Tumpa, song of the earthquake, and the Indians stamped on the ground and danced in time to the beat of its savage rhythm. They whirled into a frenzy to the words of the Wayra, dance of the winds. Then, when they had fallen, exhausted, there fell upon their ears the incredibly beautiful song known as the Xtabay, lure of the unknown love.
The Incas have an ancient legend:
The Xtabay is the most elusive of all women. You seek her in your flight of desire and think of her as beautiful as the morning sun touching the highest mountain peak. Her voice calls to you in every whisper of the wind. The lure of her unknown love becomes ever stronger, and a virgin who might have consumed your nights with tender caresses now seems less than the dry leaves of winter. For you follow the call of the Xtabay...though you walk alone through all your days.
As the sweet echoes of the last note of the Xtabay died away; Yma Sumac, daughter of the Andes, direct descendant of Atahualpa and reincarnation of the fabled voice of the unknown love, had captured the hearts of every one of them.
When news of the miraculous voice of Yma Sumac reached the cities on the plains below the Andes, her fame began to spread. Stories of her rare talent and exciting beauty reached the ears of officials of the Peruvian government, and an investigation was begun. When the rumors were confirmed, the government decided to bring her down to the coastlands; but, it is said, the decision almost caused an uprising, and great tact was necessary to avert actual blood over the threatened loss of their sacred singer...
The official story is that Yma Sumac is only 23. She was born September 10, 1927, in the Quechuan village of Ichocan. Her mother is Imma Summack Emilia Atahualpa, a full-blooded Quechua. Her father is Sixto Chavarri del Castillo, part Spanish and part Indian. She was brought up as a Quechuan.

[link]



;)  



31 Aug 2007 @ 09:19 by jazzolog : Confession
OK, I knew I was spreading a vicious rumor when I mentioned Amy Camus. Probably Billy May started it as revenge, after Yma shattered his glasses with her last note during one of their recording sessions.

 



31 Aug 2007 @ 14:37 by vaxen : Yeah...
right. Billy May, an old time Karl Rove. What a creepy looking freak.  


31 Aug 2007 @ 15:30 by jazzolog : Now You've Done It!
Billy is one of the loudly-sung heroes of my whole life! A star jazz trumpet player with Charlie Barnet and then Glenn Miller through the late 30s and until what was left of the Miller band joined World War II, he arranged many of those bands' hits. You can see him goofing around in the trumpet section in some scenes in Orchestra Wives. What's a trumpet section without at least one clown?

Then when the complications of bop weren't where he wanted to go, he took a job with the new Capitol Records...and for the next 6 or 7 years arranged the backgrounds for every kid's album to come out of the company---and they were dazzlers! All the Bozo the Clown, Rusty in Orchestraville, Woody Woodpecker, Claude Reins reading the Bible, to name a scattered few. When the Miller revival came along, somebody decided Billy May should have his own band...and it was my favorite. He even toured with the thing. Sinatra picked him up for his flat-out blast recordings and took him on to his own label, Reprise. Nat Cole's best records are with Billy's charts cookin' the way. In a time of very uptightness, Billy kept hilarity in music. He just passed away a year or 2 ago, and fortunately knew the honors his profession presented to him.  



31 Aug 2007 @ 15:43 by vaxen : Bozo?
Well, he looks like one heck of a Bozo that's for sure. Looks like a carney or shoe salesman, at best. No wonder he had to frump Imma! Well, maybe he is what went wrong with Amurrika? Nat who? Or is that Gnat? ;)

Fortunately the era of swing hung itself and no longer troubles us. Or, does it? Billy May somehow reincarnated as Karl (Goofenheimer) Rove? Makes sense in a quantum sort of way.

So, onwards to Teheran and may he have the distinction of being played very loudly -- from those attack helicopters -- as they go in, guns blazing, for old glory! Hip, hip! Hip, hip! Hip, hip; Hoorah!

[link]  



1 Sep 2007 @ 13:59 by jazzolog : so good
Jeroch's return from Omega prompted an email to a great list of folks he has amassed~~~

Hello Holy Ones,
Here I am sitting at Crumbs Bakery back in little 'ole Athens, Ohio streaming my favorite band Sound Tribe Sector 9. It is live show they just recorded on a solar powered stage in Japan at the Metamorphose 07 Festival. The show is significant, in part, because it was the reason that I traveled back to Omega for the last leg of my summer super adventure. Allow me to elaborate. Anthony Ward, the extremely talented floral arranger that I had the opportunity to work with at Omega, had a friend in Japan who insisted that he join him for a few weeks to experience the culture of the Far East. The trip just happened to coincide with a tour that Sound Tribe was also doing in Japan. Anthony has been working with the band to create amazing floral art for a few years now, so he was extremely excited to work with them in a different country, half way around the Earth. In his place I was able to hold down the fort, or ranch, or holistic healing center for about ten days. What a blessing. It allowed me time to return to Omega to finish a few projects, delve further into my spiritual self, make some kick-butt flower arrangements and have a few last minute adventures.
Even after staying there for almost four months, it is still a challenge to sum up what exactly happened to me at Omega. During that time I attempted to write a little about my experiences, but I found I really was only conveying the very top layers of the onion. To go deeper, the juicy stuff that makes you weep from within, is really what Omega is all about. So slicing that onion completely open takes a big knife, and maybe even a samurai sword.
I was able to be in the presence of world renowned healers, artists, muses, yogis, and musicians. Touch upon prayers inside myself that had been locked in the atomic structure of my being for a very long time. Befriend beacons of light, life lovers and spirit dancers from all over the country and out into this vast planet that we inhabit. Become attuned and hold a frequency of higher vibration of healing for myself, my family and the planet. Dance, sing, skip, play, meditate, do yoga, and participate in healing rituals that included concepts from many different walks of life. And all I ask in return from the Earth is that I may continue to do this work.
I would like to thank you all, for no matter how small or large your contribution to my life has been it has helped me to find the truth about myself. Today I feel very blessed. Yesterday was Karen's birthday in which she turned 24 years old and also was 24 weeks pregnant. It was a wonderful opportunity to bring our families together to celebrate a wonderful, beautiful being. I have already begun to utilize my new found passion of Floral art by creating some arrangements for a very dear friends wedding this weekend. And I had not released this information until now, but I have been working to receive my fully certified Reiki III status to do healing work in the future. Reiki is a ancient healing art recently reclaimed by Dr. Usui of Japan two centuries ago. It is the connection of Divine Universal Healing Energy and I am very excited to be able to offer this type of healing work to the world, because it is very needed on the planet right now. Giving reiki healing to your unborn child is a feeling I have no words for. WOW, thank you all. It is a very exciting time for us.
Please stay in touch, because I love to hear from family. I will keep you all updated with the goings on here in Athens as well. I love you. Jeroch  



2 Sep 2007 @ 19:29 by quinty : Nights in the Gardens of Spain
As someone once said (I don't remember if it was in conversation or if I read it somewhere) “Africa begins on the other side of the Pyrenees.” Having entered Spain from the French side, in both the Basque and Catalan regions, I know this to be true. The Arabs left a powerful and civilizing influence.

The gardens of Spain. There is nothing quite so refreshing or romantic as strolling along the empty path of a large garden at night in Andalucia. The Arabic element is still there but it has become so European. Stop in a small tavern. Inside you will find a man or two playing the guitar. Four or five other men singing. Some women too. Here, in these simple impromptu scenes, you will find the real Flamenco. Order your drink and sit down. Nobody will care even if you are obviously a foreigner. You will, unless you are a complete fool, be welcome. This is how some Spaniards entertain themselves at night.

Problem is in Seville there is a high crime rate. Kids on motor bikes like to quickly whisk by tourists strolling along past the great sites: the cathedral, the castle, etc. As they do they simply reach out and grab the purse or leather carryall bag at the poor tourist’s side. And off they go, down the street. I once saw an especially fat American or German desperately waddle after the kid on his motorbike. He could have cared less, that kid, and was gone in less than a minute. Serene as a butterfly.

That’s what poverty does to you. The poor prey on tourists. Usually it’s smalltime graft, overcharging a Euro or two for some fruit, or taking the tourist on an excessively long cab drive. Even in a train station the man selling tickets may overcharge the tourist and pocket the change. That’s the way it sometimes is among the poor. While the vast majority of locals, poor or not, are honorable and honest. Even if they desperately need the money.

The gardens of Spain are fragrant and romantic. You can hear it in the music of Albenez and Granados. In de Falla, too, whose house is at the foot of the Ahlambra in Granada. If you ever go you may wish to visit. Just to see how a great composer lived.

It’s still there, what those composers caught, still there in the air, on the streets, in the mood sometimes surrounding you. The modern world hasn’t completely destroyed all that. We have simply moved away, toward a new future, whatever it will be. And change is inevitable, right?  



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