NCN World Poet Tree: Smiles    
 Smiles3 comments
picture 13 Mar 2006 @ 16:14

Your Smile

I saw your smile today,
blazing colors across the
evening sky, rich warm
blended shades
stretching east to west.
How could I not stand
entranced by the awe of the
richness of your expression?
You are my gentle breeze,
soft whispering against the
cold of winter, breaking
the back of the storm.
Some treasures are spoiled
by the opening of the box,
corrupted by
exposure to common air,
but not your look, my beloved!

N Marion HageĀ© 12/28/05


Your Smile

I saw your smile today,
blazing colors across the
evening sky, rich warm
blended shades
stretching east to west.
How could I not stand
entranced by the awe of the
richness of your expression?
You are my gentle breeze,
soft whispering against the
cold of winter, breaking
the back of the storm.
Some treasures are spoiled
by the opening of the box,
corrupted by
exposure to common air,
but not your look, my beloved!

N Marion HageĀ© 12/28/05

About Poetry: "Poetry is the most natural voice of the soul. When we first learn to speak, we did not use lots of words. In fact, we didn't have words, only sounds, wants and dislikes. Children speak in simple words, "Food...tired...pretty..."

In the beginning, society didn't have lots of words. We don't realize the complexity of language evolved over time. With the increase of language came the increase of confusion, and that which was a tool to communicate became a source of alienation. There is nothing more frustrating to the human soul than not being understood and not being able to get a point across.

We are most satisfied when we communicate thoughts, and our feelings are understood. Hunger, thirst, tired, wet. Children speak in short sentences but convey, "I want nurture, to be taken care of, to be loved, and cared for."

Language is both a tool and barrier. Mothers learn to recognize the tone of the child's voice before there are distinguishable words. "That's his happy sound! That's his hungry sound!"

Poetry is our attempt to go beyond words, to speaking in a tone, not just a string of words. "Hear my feeling, what my soul feels..." And in some respects two people sitting silently together, hearing spirit to spirit, knowing the other's thoughts is poetic.

In poetry I want you to hear my feelings, and not just words. I want to connect spirit to spirit, with all the confusion removed.

We want tone, not just words. How do you say, "Hungry, tired, wet, scared?" Is it with conviction, or clouded in jargon?

A child conveys his needs without a lexicon. It's not what he says, but how he says it that moves the mother and father to respond. We are hard-wired to hear children. Any parent who tries to tune them out will find themselves frustrated. Why? A part of us is connected, and wants to understand. We can ignore a litany of paragraphs much easier than a child's cry. Emotions tug our strings, and force us to listen.

We all long for deeper bonds, perhaps not exactly like the mother/child bond. But we want to convey pure meaning, to be heard, and hopefully to touch and be touched.

In the beginning there were few words. Complex language evolved over time. This didn't make us more sophisticated, but lazy. Once upon a time we were forced to use few words to make a complex point. "The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed..." That doesn't sound like a cosmic formula, because it is not a cosmic formula. It is a simple word picture.

Word pictures are made with "Bread, Seed, Wine, Water..." common words. But we hear something when common words are spoken in a word picture.

"What is a seed? What are the properties of water? Flowing, soothing, sometimes powerful, refreshing, life giving!"

Our words are like seed. As they are sown, the hearer ponders meaning, and the seed grows.

Something small and seemingly dormant becomes a source of life and growth.

A well spoken poetic word is something beyond words. It is raw emotion expressed:

"Love me! Take care of meI I want to be happy! You hurt me! I'm frustrated! I'm not happy!" - bold emotions can be conveyed in word pictures.

Use of many words to say something simple clouds the issue. We may wax eloquent to convey we want something, but often we shroud our thoughts in intellectual dishonesty. We fear being fully seen and fully heard, for being judged. And so, we hide the fact that we are beings with wants and desires, "Mother, if it is alright, and you are so disposed, and it is not too near to dinner time, can I have a glass of milk and some cookies? But I don't want to be a bother, or disappoint you, so do what you think best!"

"I want cookies!" Sometimes the only way to motivate is to strip communication to the barest essentials.

Instead of saying, "You really shouldn't take everything, and not let others have some, because in a society..."

No, say, "Selfish! Self-centered! Stop being a hog!"

"Hungry" is no longer enough. We are weary of having to play this game of trying to win approval and ask for our needs to be met. We want to say, "I want love! Touch me! Comfort me! Hold me! Feed me!" But instead there is a wearisome dance where true thoughts are rarely conveyed, and people walk around frustrated and angry and depressed.

Poetry is returning to the roots of communication, emotions, feelings, and with a single word, convey a sea of feelings or thoughts.

Moreover, it is a metaphorical allegorical world which acts as stimulation for the mind, to break it out of traditional boxes. All world religions use metaphors and allegories. All world philosophies use riddles and proverbs, which are often written in poetic form.

A good poem is an invitation to look deeper, to dig for hidden meaning, and think beyond the sentence, so that when the last word is read, the mind stays engaged. And, so it is a tool for me to both express my feelings, and yet, draw others into a realm where they ponder further meaning.

This is why people can make a poem their own, and hang it on their mirror, just like words to a song. Some words have life in them, and continue to speak to hearts far beyond the poet, and his intended readers. This is because the poet is often speaking from the soul, and not from the mind, with all of its Archetypical arguments.

We want to connect, and communicate soul to soul with another. We want to know how they feel, what they think. And so, when someone hits us with a wave of intellectual honesty, it is like a thunder bolt that grabs our attention.

True poetic voices have power to speak words to touch masses of people, because people are tired of pablum, and candy words with no substance. Give me one person who speaks their mind, their soul, their spirit, depth, not shallow empty sports, news and weather. Give me meaning or give me death, which is often the heart of the poet."

N Marion Hage.



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3 comments

13 Mar 2006 @ 18:14 by jstarrs : A virus, also?
Burroughs maintained that but look what happened to his wife!
Nice post, thanks.  



13 Mar 2006 @ 19:54 by poetsong : Question for administrator
Why does the post change "Expression" to "Expressiol?" It was posted correctly twice?  


20 Mar 2006 @ 10:33 by monique : Like it
Hi Nate,
I like this one a lot, it is simple and multi-faceted at the same time. Very nice to read. So, it's good that it is posted twice. :)  



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