Ned Hamson's News from the Second Line: Jeb Bush Campaign to Look Good on Terror Begins    
 Jeb Bush Campaign to Look Good on Terror Begins1 comment
10 Dec 2006 @ 18:23, by Ned Hamson

Is Jeb Bush just like the other Bush League leaders -- Georges 2 and Britain's Blair -- who regularly use deceit, dishonor, and deny to gain and maintain their power?

Wait - what do you mean 3-D?

Deceive or lie about why a nation should go to war, lead fellow travelers and trusting followers, or employees to believe that it's OK to truss up and "torture" suspected terrorists and thus dishonor themselves, then deny that you knew or supported them.

Deceive supporters about what you will do once in office to end all abortions, stop gay agenda, protect children, and get prayer back in schools. Cover-up or bury information about your insiders who daily dishonor their public moral beliefs and then deny that they ever knew them or what they were doing. And deny they have the power or influence to make good on their promises.

That's 3-D Leadership.

After 9-11, Jeb's brother said he would do everything to make the nation safe. Five years have gone by and if you wanted to hire 100 terrorists and give them fake CDL ID to drive 16 wheels of death, disease and destruction all over the nation and into any port or truck stop today, it would not be a problem because the programs designed to prevent such a leaky security system are still in disarray.

Transportation experts and officials all over the nation will agree with that assessment but now a former Florida Highway Patrol Officer turned consultant is trying to lay the groundwork for saying that a system in Florida under Jeb Bush, has been a success.

TSA public relations officials point to successful tests of the biometric ID elements of the TWIC card in at least one location -- the state of Florida -- where Billy Dickson, a retired lieutenant colonel with the Florida State Highway Police, says his department conducted a “short-term test on the TWIC card a year ago at the Port of Canaveral and Port of Pensacola.” Dickson is now a senior management analyst with the Florida Department of Highway Safety.
“We proved to ourselves that the biometric piece worked,” said Dickson, explaining they set up enrollment centers at the ports using a General Electric-designed chip based on driver's fingerprints. Acknowledging initial bugs – not to mention the fact that two to four percent of the population (including truckers) didn’t have what he calls “usable fingerprints” – Dickson says the cards are about to go “operational” in Panama City and Fernandina Beach, Fla., north of Jacksonville.
Dickson has no numbers on truckers involved, but believes there are “a significant amount because Fernandina has big truck movement.” At Panama City, the 400 people issued TWIC cards with the GE technology for biometric IDs included seaport workers and truckers, with no breakout on truckers, says Dickson. They’re also looking at facial recognition and iris scans as “suitable alternatives” to fingerprints for any one coming and going from Florida ports.

A national standard for the Transportation Security Agency (TSA) scanning equipment exists, but not for biometric technologies that relate to trucking industry security, says Dominique Harrington, deputy director of testing services for the National Biometric Security Project.

This may seem too obscure to be a plus for wannabee president Jeb Bush but I believe he has learned from his brother that when you are going to deceive the public, you need to have lots of sources that look good at first glance. Remember that the bricks supporting Iraq's weapons of mass destruction turned out to be nothing but spray-painted bundles of straw-bricks.

Just tuck this away in your memory when you see claims that Jeb Bush is a real anti-terror leader - not!

Biometric IDs as Protection Against Turnpike Terror Undermined by, Greed, Politicization, & Lies

Special Notes: One way to raise Governor Bush’s national profile and a run in 2008 to keep Bush family in national power is to portray him as an effective fighter against potential terrorists.

Fudged data or outright distortions of the truth by former Bush employees may be used later to “prove” Jeb Bush is a tough, winning leader.”
TSA public relations officials point to successful tests of the biometric ID elements of the TWIC card in at least one location -- the state of Florida -- where Billy Dickson, a retired lieutenant colonel with the Florida State Highway Police, says his department conducted a “short-term test on the TWIC card a year ago at the Port of Canaveral and Port of Pensacola.” Dickson is now a senior management analyst with the Florida Department of Highway Safety.
“We proved to ourselves that the biometric piece worked,” said Dickson, explaining they set up enrollment centers at the ports using a General Electric-designed chip based on driver's fingerprints. Acknowledging initial bugs – not to mention the fact that two to four percent of the population (including truckers) didn’t have what he calls “usable fingerprints” – Dickson says the cards are about to go “operational” in Panama City and Fernandina Beach, Fla., north of Jacksonville.
Dickson has no numbers on truckers involved, but believes there are “a significant amount because Fernandina has big truck movement.” At Panama City, the 400 people issued TWIC cards with the GE technology for biometric IDs included seaport workers and truckers, with no breakout on truckers, says Dickson. They’re also looking at facial recognition and iris scans as “suitable alternatives” to fingerprints for any one coming and going from Florida ports.

The story below demonstrates that there is more disorder than order in the many ID systems which we hope will assure we know who is driving hazardous material around the country or has free access to port facilities nationwide.


For the last 20 years, experts have touted biometrics as a method to safeguard the trucking industry from theft, fraud and, more recently, terrorism, yet today only a handful of states are using biometric technology in commercial drivers licenses (CDL) while use of biometrics at the nation’s ports and borders appears largely stalled.
Biometrics involves the use of human characteristics such as fingerprints, irises or facial scans to identify an individual. When embedded in a computer chip, individual human characteristics can be embedded in an ID card as part of credentialing or for security processes.
What’s happened to biometrics and the CDL is a long story of many failed bureaucratic initiatives to embrace biometrics for CDLs (see timeline box). Experts and officials nationwide cite a variety of reasons -- from lack of standardized data bases for fingerprinting to problems with technology and lack of biometric standards for trucking -- not to mention the redirection of biometrics for homeland security measures after 9/11.
One problem in applying biometrics for CDLs is the fact that the FBI's enormous fingerprint database can't be tapped for civilian use, says Michael Yura, senior vice president for the West Virginia Operations for the Washington, D.C.-based National Biometric Security Project. This slows access of information and means that various federal agencies, along with the states, have to collect their own fingerprints – none of which can communicate with the FBI's database, he said..
Then there's the lack of a federally-mandated standard for a biometric ID card so no one card operates across all security or risk-related programs -- whether at seaports, airports and border crossings – and for CDLs. A national standard for the Transportation Security Agency (TSA) scanning equipment exists, but not for biometric technologies that relate to trucking industry security, says Dominique Harrington, deputy director of testing services for the National Biometric Security Project. She agrees that without a national standard vendors are free to manufacture to whatever standard they believe works best for the marketplace, and biometric ID technology manufactured by one vendor may not work with technology made by another.
"If the trucking world wants a national standard for biometrics technology to be used in trucking they need to attend the M1 ANSI Insights Committee for Biometrics," she said. M1 is a private industry standards committee hosted by the Information Technology Industry Council (ITIC) based in Washington, D.C.
Despite bureaucratic nightmares, cranky technology and what appears to be general confusion, biometrics are being tested in the field and are eking out there under the auspices of a number of state initiatives. Since the 1990s, use of biometrics in CDLs has grown to include the states of Illinois, Georgia, Oklahoma, California, Hawaii, Colorado, Texas, Massachusetts, Oregon, Kansas and Alabama, and possibly a handful of others, though information on exactly what states are utilizing biometrics was not available from federal agencies or associations like the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) in Alexandria, Va.
Information on state-wide efforts to utilize either digitized fingerprints or facial features came largely from press releases from vendors such as Digimarc Corp. in Beaverton, Ore., which flatly declined to comment for this article. Digimarc is reportedly working with the Oregon Driver and Motor Vehicles Services (DMV) to apply facial recognition technology to CDLs. The company also announced this summer it had a contract to work with the Massachusetts DMV and state police applying facial recognition technology to state CDLs.
SAGEM Morpho, Inc. of Tacoma, Wash. has been working with Viisage, a Nashville, Tenn. provider of advanced technology solutions to provide finger imaging in CDLs in Oklahoma. And Viisage's IBT Division, which manufactures biometric-related technologies, reported in July that it had signed a contract with the state of Illinois to develop the biometrics for the state's commercial driver's licenses. According to Viisage officials, they were planning to “extend hazardous fingerprinting capabilities both for the Illinois Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) Commercial HazMat Drivers” with the aim of eventually providing biometric-based driver’s licenses to the state’s estimated 465,000 commercial drivers.
The national effort to embed security technology in driver’s licenses is called REAL ID. Jason King, vice president of public relations and information services of AAMVA says no specific technology has been mandated at this time for REAL ID. “AAMVA has not seen sufficient evidence that any one biometric or combination of biometrics could satisfy the requirement for interstate usage. But several states have had success with biometrics on a single jurisdiction basis, mostly with facial recognition. Bottom line: biometrics have proven useful as a tool for DMVs, but AAMVA is not yet convinced that we could use them at an interstate level,” King said.
Elaine Dezenski, senior vice president for global movement at Cross Match Technologies in Arlington, Va. – developer of ID management solutions for the federal government and commercial sector -- explains that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) “is trying to get their hands around what the regulations should look like for a driver’s license standard. There are lots of issues, including what card looks like, what technology to put in it -- swiping or magnetic – and whether to go biometric or not,” she said.
Agencies that deal with hazardous materials -- also known as hazmat – are reportedly collecting truck driver fingerprints to eventually apply to biometric IDs. Although agencies like the Department of Homeland Security are working on ensuring that terrorists don’t infiltrate the trucking industry, and are obtaining fingerprints on hazmat drivers, Dezenski says she doesn’t think the fingerprints are yet embedded in an ID card that can be read electronically. “This is a huge subject,” Dezenski said of hazmat. “It’s kind of the litmus test to see how things would be rolled out and made accessible to a large population of workers spread out throughout the country.”
There are also roadblocks to utilizing a CDL with embedded biometrics for security clearances. Dan Murray, vice president of research for the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI), based in the St. Paul, Minn. office, cites layers of jurisdiction over security matters "without a central blue print" as a stumbling block in developing biometric IDs that would include CDLs. "Even within TSA, multiple systems and vendors are contracted to develop unique pieces of the Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) ID for ports, for example. Some of the most basic questions -- that should have been answered early in the architecture design -- are still unanswered," he said.
As a result, he says an airline pilot's TWIC card wouldn't work at the Port of LA/Long Beach. "Maybe that's OK, but what about a truck driver that serves both the Port and LAX airport?"
For those who argue that industry standards for biometrics exist and should suffice, Murray says "that's patently incorrect." He says the biometric algorithms used by each vendor "are different enough – which is what gives them their unique selling proposition -- that the various systems proposed today will not talk to each other. Applying the smart card 'GSA standard' and saying the TWIC card is standardized and interoperable is patently incorrect. It would be very simple to take a west coast port card walk it over to an east coast port and see if the gate opens. Why hasn't anyone done that yet?"
According to James L. Wayman, director, U.S. National Biometric Test Center, College of Engineering at San Jose State University, and one of the country's leading experts on biometrics, says "some states claim to be using biometrics, but the claims are dicey. California admits that their 22-year-old system isn't really being used: fingerprints are collected as required by law, but not used. There is a new RFP out from the CaliforniaDMV proposing to use both facial recognition and fingerprinting for all DLs.
Wayman adds that the following states require fingerprinting for all driver's licenses, including CDLS: California, Texas, Georgia, Hawaii and Colorado. Colorado and Illinois claim to be using facial recognition for all driver's licenses. Michigan and Delaware have outlawed the use of biometrics with driver's licenses, he says, adding that "the problem with all of these projects is that there have been no audits of any of these systems except for California, which isn't being used except for the collection of prints."
Officials at the California DMV could not comment, saying they were in the "procurement process."
The REAL ID Act, signed into law in 2005 to address driver's licenses, "does not mention biometrics. It gives the DOT (or maybe the Department of Homeland Security) the power to set requirements. Those requirements have not yet been set, but will certainly not include biometrics. As you know, the states are upset with the 'unfunded mandate' nature of the Real ID Act to begin with. They may revolt anyway, with or without a biometrics requirement," Wayman added.
TSA and DHS public relations officials were still trying to answer these questions at deadline time for this article. But from the perspective of fleet owners like Philip Byrd, the lack of standardization has become a mish-mash that could result in truck drivers carrying large numbers of biometric IDs to enter various facilities. Owner of Bulldog Hiway Express, a regional full truckload carrier based in North Charleston, S.C., Byrd spoke on behalf of the ATA at the Oct. 10 U.S. House Small Business Committee hearings on the TWIC ID card, which is supposed to utilize biometrics for trucker clearance at the nation’s ports.
Byrd echoed the committee chair’s assertions that the government’s TWIC security process for port workers was too cumbersome and costly for America's small businesses and needs to be revamped and strengthened to be effective. According to a report posted on the ATA Web site, Byrd advised the committee that the TWIC rules, as proposed, place a significant burden on commerce and small intermodal trucking companies without commensurate security benefits. He particularly identified the costly, inefficient and duplicative nature of the pending credentialing proposal and its failure to preempt state and local background checks and access requirements that would unduly burden truckers entering individual port facilities around the country, according to this report.
Reached after his Washington, D.C. appearance, Byrd emphasized that he had no problem with TWIC “in concept,” but complained about lack of a national standard to create one technology that would translate into one biometric-based ID for multiple purposes from entering ports to airports and border crossings – all governed by different government agencies and or security
and/or supply chain related programs.
Regarding TWIC, Byrd said “every port is doing it’s own thing when we should have the same process for TWIC as hazmat,” or border crossings. Without a national standard for biometric technology, he said drivers would have to carry “20 to 15 plastic cards. How do you carry all that around and how does a driver keep up?” he asked.
According to Byrd, “There should be a system in place across America where one universal card screens drivers properly so commerce takes place uninterrupted and at the same time secure our gates and borders. The trucking industry wants a good, thorough system and doesn’t want to go through this process of being credentialed for biometric IDs more than once.”
Martin Rojas, Executive director of Safety Security of Operations, ATA echoes Byrd’s concern about the rise of multiple programs utilizing biometrics that will require drivers to carry multiple cards because the technology may not be interoperable – meaning functional from one system or program to another. While supporting the use of background checks for drivers, he says that these be based on risk.
“Each screening represents a separate cost and process, and some drivers that operate at ports, transport hazardous materials or move C-TPAT cargo across the border undergo three separate, yet equal, screenings. One screening process should suffice, and that is why we support the concept of the TWIC. But the way it is being implemented now, the TWIC is simply an additional screening process, with a high cost, that is not universal in nature as it was originally intended. TSA has stated that it is its intent to make the TWIC a single process for all screenings, but we need to get to implementing it as such."
Despite their concerns, most interviewed for this article are true believers in biometrics as a concept and want to see biometric technologies embedded in one universal ID card to thwart theft and terrorism. "I think biometrics is still a phenomenal opportunity and a sound concept, but we seem to have a difficult time moving from concept to operational reality," said ATRI's Murray. "I think unfortunately there's a range of issues (in this field) from policy and programs to technology applications and interoperability."
Basically, the question isn't technology, which Murray says "is feasible." But with TWIC, for example, he says "when you move quickly to various environments and go to interoperability -- trying to apply TWIC to provide facility access, whether that's getting into my own back gate, port or airport, that's when we seem to be running into brick wall."

Word Count: 1900

_____________________________
TWIC SIDEBAR

Today it’s possible to find IDs at a handful of ports -- mainly in Florida -- under the auspices of the federal TWIC (Transportation Worker Identification Credential) program. TWIC's purpose is to identify and then clear truck drivers to enter ports.
However, Lisa Himber, vice president of the Maritime Exchange in Philadelphia., Pa. – with offices at the Port of Wilmington, Del. – also raised concerns about the lack of a national standard for biometric ID technology. But Himber is equally concerned about the fact that although TWIC enrollment readers were installed as early at August 2002 for pilot programs at Delaware River, Dela.; Long Beach, Calif. and a number of Florida ports --pilots completed in June of 2005 – the readers aren't activated today to identify truckers coming and going from port facilities.
And this despite the fact that each site had to laboriously enroll truckers and take their fingerprints to be embedded in the card. Moreover, she says although all pilot sites tested the magnetic strip and smart chip portions of the IDs, “testing of the biometric part of the card wasn’t completed at all at any port facilities.” Her office did test the biometric ID features, but not at the port facilities. Himber says they arranged a test as a means of entering their computer room and the technology worked under those conditions, though as not verified in the field.
She doesn’t know what’s happened to the biometric-embedded TWIC cards issued to close to 3,000 truckers who enrolled in the TWIC program pilot site in Delaware. As for why the biometrics weren’t tested, Himber says “only TSA can say. “We expected it would be, but why we don't know. The biometrics wasn't tested sufficiently for the pilots, but the TSA is saying that biometrics were successfully tested.”
Greg Owen supports the concept behind TWIC, which he says emerged as part of the Graham/Hollings legislation introduced two years before 9/11 to curb theft at the nation's ports. CEO and Head Coach of Tri-Modal Transportation Services, Carson, Calif., and an active member of ATA, Owens is so security conscious that he offered his facility as a TWIC ID card test site for the Port of Long Beach/San Pedro this year.
"The problem was we never got to test the product live,” said Owen, offering no explanation. "There were the normal startup problems with computers, applications, pre-process, initial card and final card problems, along with the separation of drivers for Hazmat and TWIC, but everyone (agencies involved) was protecting their turf. I'd wanted one card -- in our case, the commercial drivers license – working for all three purposes -- the state driver's license, Hazmat and TWIC for security."
He believes the "biggest stumbling block behind TWIC is organized labor. They just don't want it. The idea of a good background check threatens their livelihood. Personally I hope we get the chance to be a model for industry. I believe TWIC has merit and needs to move forward," he said.
TSA public relations officials point to successful tests of the biometric ID elements of the TWIC card in at least one location -- the state of Florida -- where Billy Dickson, a retired lieutenant colonel with the Florida State Highway Police, says his department conducted a “short-term test on the TWIC card a year ago at the Port of Canaveral and Port of Pensacola.” Dickson is now a senior management analyst with the Florida Department of Highway Safety.
“We proved to ourselves that the biometric piece worked,” said Dickson, explaining they set up enrollment centers at the ports using a General Electric-designed chip based on driver's fingerprints. Acknowledging initial bugs – not to mention the fact that two to four percent of the population (including truckers) didn’t have what he calls “usable fingerprints” – Dickson says the cards are about to go “operational” in Panama City and Fernandina Beach, Fla., north of Jacksonville.
Dickson has no numbers on truckers involved, but believes there are “a significant amount because Fernandina has big truck movement.” At Panama City, the 400 people issued TWIC cards with the GE technology for biometric IDs included seaport workers and truckers, with no breakout on truckers, says Dickson. They’re also looking at facial recognition and iris scans as “suitable alternatives” to fingerprints for any one coming and going from Florida ports.


TIMELINE BOX – ________________

Editor’s Note: This material is culled from the archive of “Transport Topics,” “MOVE Magazine” (Biometric Applications – Big Boon or Big Brother, 1997) and Web searches.

∑ 1986 – The Commercial Vehicle Safety Act makes it illegal for commercial drivers to have more than one license. At this time the Federal Highway Safety Administration (FHSA) commissioned a study of the use of biometrics for commercial driver licenses (CDL). It’s determined the technology isn’t up to the job.

∑ August 1988 – FHWA officials say they are committed to developing a “unique identifier” for CDLs, but it’s too early to mandate a specific technology. ATA officials called this decision “a major failing in the CDL rulemaking” and then ATA President Thomas J. Donoghue said FHWA was “sabotaging” it’s own rules by not including “the key element that would ensure the integrity of the commercial driver licensing system.”

∑ May 1989 – FHWA announces it will test two forms of biometric ID technologies in California in an effort to set standards. They planned to test a retinal and9 a fingerprint system.

∑ March 1991 – FHWA suspends the rulemaking on biometrics because current technology (then current) didn’t meet their standards. But officials say they will keep their eye on developments that indicate technology had matured to meet appropriate requirements.

∑ Mid-1990s – late 1990s - The FHWA revisited the issue, commissioning Jim Wayman of San Jose State University to conduct a study on the use of biometrics for CDLs. Wayman determines the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) should establish standards for biometrics and CDLs.

Shortly, after being awarded the CDL applications study, the university was designated as the U.S. National Biometric Test Center and Wayman offers to teach the first course on biometrics in the United States. The California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) forms a biometric subcommittee under the auspices of AAMVA.

California leads the country in capturing finger images and its DMV announces that it hopes to have a full file of digitized electronic thumbprints by the end of 1999. Around the same time the states of Colorado start collecting digitized thumbprints and Texas starts the conversion to scanned images in 1995.

∑ October 1995 – FHWA commissions San Jose State University to develop biometric identification standards for possible use with CDLs. Electronic fingerprinting is designated as the key biometric technology meeting requirements at that time, though FHWA officials believe this situation could change over time.

∑ On May 11, 2005, President Bush signed into law the "REAL ID Act of 2005," which was attached to the "Emergency Supplemental Appropriation for Defense, the Global War on Terror, and Tsunami Relief, 2005" (H.R. 1268, P.L. 109-13). Title II of REAL ID-"Improved Security for Driver's License' and Personal Identification Cards"-repeals the provisions of a December 2004 law that established a cooperative state-federal process to create federal standards for driver's licenses and instead directly imposes prescriptive federal driver's license standards. The following table summarizes the act's driver's license title.


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1 comment

11 Dec 2006 @ 00:09 by vaxen : Heya Ned,
Good to hear from you again. Of course the biometrics is a scam. But if people will not wake up and participate in their own freedom, well, just what can you expect the tyrants on Capitol hill to do?

However, you may not know it but there is, in orbit, a secret sat grid which ID's target via Encephalography. Spot scanned from orbit, put in a can, laid out on the ice till dead. Welcome to your future. Keep that powder dry.

Gratz on the progress...

"The height of your accomplishments will equal the
depth of your convictions." -- William F. Scolavino  



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